Confession: I Am Addicted!

While I was cooking on Saturday morning, I was listening to a podcast on the Enneagram, and that’s when it hit me!  I stopped mid-lasagna assembly, to make the admission OUT LOUD to myself. Why out loud: because I have been told and said many, many times, that the first step to fixing a problem is to actually acknowledge that there is one. Yes, I have a problem.

So before  the world, well as least those of you who read these, I confess to you all. I have an addiction to Self-Awareness!  You’re wondering, is that even possible. Well, let me tell you it is. Ready? This is scary; it’s like letting you look inside my closet, for real. Transparency, here I come.

According to these assessments: I AM…

Myers-Briggs (Myers-Briggs): ESFJ

Strengths Finder (Strengths Finder): Learner, Activator, Achiever, Maximizer, Input

DISC (DISC): I

Enneagram (Enneagram):  2w3

Professional DynaMetric Programs (PDP) (PDP): Extrovert (extreme)

Spiritual Gifts (Spiritual Gifts): Administration and Exhortation

(The links I provided are to the assessments I took-feel free to take find others. I linked them here for you as a starting point. For the PDP, feel free to contact me.)

Those are just the ones I’ve limited myself to taking for now. And by the way, if you know what all those mean, you might be an addict too. Just so you know, I’m going with the fact that I’m not alone in this and some of you are addicts too!

Five things my addiction has taught me:

  1. I’m made this way because God decided it, which means I do not need to apologize for being me. In fact, I celebrate it!
  2. There are things I’m not supposed to be good at doing or knowing and that is perfectly acceptable too.
  3. My perception is my reality and understanding myself better helps me understand those around me and that they don’t see the world and life the same way I do.
  4. I get better every day at working within my strengths instead of apologizing for not being good at stuff. I do this because I feel it, which is powerful! It makes me better at what I do and allows me to help others live/work within their strengths.
  5. It is not about ONE tool. It is about all aspects and how they work together.

I admit, I like being an addict. It has served me well personally and professionally, to know why some things work and some things don’t. It has assisted me in helping others learn more about themselves and be at peace rather than being disappointed in who they are. In this life, we all strive, hunger, and yearn for connection, for relationships, and to be heard and to be known. Understanding myself first opens doors to building those relationships.

As this new year begins, I would encourage you to choose one of these tools, or other ones (but please don’t share them with me, because as an addict, I can’t say no to taking those assessments). Find out your strengths; find out how you’re wired; reflect on how God wants to use you through those this year. It is worth the investment you will make!

What about you?

I would love to hear what tool you like and how that has helped you in your life, personally or professionally.